Glasgow:
The maps

A small extract from the map
A small extract from the map

Glasgow's plans were documented in enough detail that they can be plotted onto Google Earth's satellite photography and distributed as a map overlay. Install it and you'll see the whole plan, accurate to within a few metres, and showing all junction layouts. It is a mix of A Highway Plan for Glasgow and The Greater Glasgow Transportation Plan: in general, where the two differ, the map shows the most interesting variant, and usually favours the original proposal.

To use the map, you will need a working version of Google Earth installed on your computer.

Download the file below and double-click it to open it with Google Earth. (If it doesn't open automatically, you can instead open Google Earth and then drag the file in.) You will see a new item in the 'Places' box to the left of the screen, called Glasgow.kmz, and the program will zoom to an overview of the Glasgow area showing the proposals.

You can zoom and scroll around the map as normal; the roads will show at all altitudes. As you zoom in you'll be able to see the individual junction layouts.

About Google Earth

If you don't already have Google Earth, you can download it for free from google.com/earth. It works with Windows, Mac and Linux, and requires a high speed internet connection. Roads.org.uk is not affiliated with Google and is not responsible for this software.

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