Hogarth Flyover

The Hogarth Flyover is more than just a bridge carrying traffic — it's a metaphor for the whole of British transport planning in the late 20th century.

It was constructed in the early 1970s as a temporary solution to the traffic problems at the Hogarth Roundabout, which was due to be rebuilt in the near future as part of the Ringway plans. It was quickly put together with a cheap steel frame and was designed to last no more than a few years.

As you've probably guessed by now, that temporary flyover is still there. It's been in situ for more than 30 years and there's no intention to replace it. In fact, since these pictures were taken, it's undergone a major refurbishment project, with a largely new deck, surface and parapets, ensuring its survival and confirming that it's now a permanent fixture. It's make-do-and-mend on an epic scale.

A plan of the Hogarth Roundabout and Flyover. Click to enlarge
A plan of the Hogarth Roundabout and Flyover. Click to enlarge
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